• Froufrou, Anne-Charlotte Piot & Maureen Barbette. Photo : Anne-Charlotte Piot & Maureen Barbette
  • Froufrou, Anne-Charlotte Piot & Maureen Barbette. Photo : Anne-Charlotte Piot & Maureen Barbette
  • Froufrou, Anne-Charlotte Piot & Maureen Barbette. Photo : Anne-Charlotte Piot & Maureen Barbette
  • Froufrou, Anne-Charlotte Piot & Maureen Barbette. Photo : Anne-Charlotte Piot & Maureen Barbette
  • Cailloux, Anne-Charlotte Piot & Maureen Barbette. Photo : Anne-Charlotte Piot & Maureen Barbette
designers shortlist 2015
Anne-Charlotte Piot & Maureen Barbette
France
Froufrou
Caillou

Chou, hibou, Froufrou, caillou! Anne-Charlotte Piot & Maureen Barbette’s projects reveal themselves like joyful images. This duo envisions an expressive world full of vivid colours inhabited by a profusion of objects of various typologies: illuminated paper, super comfy sneakers, lightweight vegetable grigris. A trip to India strengthened their desire to bring the sacred into homes. On their return, they created Froufrou, inspired by the small, richly brocaded altars they had seen there. These enclosed shelves are miniature theatres for storing our precious objects. Two basic elements serve as the structure: a steel support attached to the wall, capped with a wavy headdress in oak trimmed with a curtain. The choice of these multicoloured ornaments is intuitive and varies according to the mood; plastic pearls, leather fringes, or dyed horsehair.
The Larousse dictionary defines a caillou as “any kind of small pebble which might have been sculpted by glaciers, the wind, water.” The duo reveal the fantastic potential of these fragments of minerals by reproducing them on a grand scale and placing them into our everyday lives. Recreated out of plaster, seven pebbles mark out an imaginary path in a home where each bears a function: lamp, mirror, small shelf, coat rack, coffee table, vase, and multi-socket. They are covered in a powdered ink like lichen from which, here, there and everywhere sprout bulbs, electrical components and even stalks. The duo do not wish to impose any form of narrative, having conceived these objects as emotional supports which may be appropriated freely
by everyone.

Text — Magalie Guérin