• Etagère Carbone, édition limitée, Pierre Charpin, Galerie kreo, 2013. Photo : Galerie kreo
  • Scatola 9, Oggetti Lenti, Pierre Charpin, Design Gallery Milano, limited edition, 2005. Photo : Ilvio Gallo

  • Ceramica 2, Ogetti lenti, limited edition, Pierre Charpin, Design Gallery Milano, 2005. Photo : Ilvio Gallo
  • Ignotus Nomen, limited edition, Pierre Charpin, Galerie kreo, 2011. Photo : Fabrice Gousset
  • Stump, Pierre Charpin, Ligne Roset, 2009.
  • Vase Ruban, Pierre Charpin, Manufacture nationale de Sèvres - Galerie kreo, 2008. Photo : Gérard Jonca
  • Crescendo, limited edition, Pierre Charpin, Galerie kreo, 2012. Photo : Fabrice Gousset
  • 8½, Pierre Charpin, Galerie kreo, limited edition, 2009. Photo : Fabrice Gousset
  • Stands, Pierre Charpin, Design Gallery Milano, 2002. Photo : Pierre Antoine
  • ST 05, Stands, Pierre Charpin, Design Gallery Milano, 2002. Photo : Pierre Antoine
  • Etagère Carbone, édition limitée, Pierre Charpin, Galerie kreo, 2013. Photo : Galerie kreo
exhibitions 2015

Associated exhibitions
Pierre Charpin
Villégiature
This exhibition presents around forty objects and thirty drawings created between the early 1990s and now. Representative of my work, this selection exposes the links which exist between the objects’ formal language and the graphical language of the drawings.

Presented in no particular chronological or hierarchical order,  objects produced in limited series stand alongside industrial or manufactured objects, as well as a few prototypes. The exhibition takes advantage of the location’s singularity, hence two spaces, the pool room and the squash court, adopt a very simple binary criteria of classification: in the pool room are objects destined to be placed on a horizontal plane, on the floor, upon a table or a shelf; in the squash court are objects destined to be placed, or more precisely hung, on a vertical plane, like that of a wall or a partition.
This committed approach exhibits the importance I have always given to the articulation between an object and the space which surrounds it, an articulation which I consider to be decisive in the object’s very design.
In the pool room, the deliberately horizontal scenography evokes an island which, placed in the middle of the room, plays with the original function of the space and echoes the vast maritime seascape which may be seen from the room. Herein objects are offered to the visitors’ gaze as they are invited to walk around this imaginary island, in order to discover like an amateur ornithologist, the selection of objects which have taken temporary refuge whilst waiting for a future destination, as do some migratory birds during the stages which punctuate their long migration.
In the squash court, the objects and drawings are simply hung upon the wall, leaving the space totally free in order to best render its original nature. The floor, covered in small white gravel, presents a particular sonority and luminosity which offer the visitors a consciousness of their own movements as they walk around, approaching the objects and drawings which have taken the walls surrounding this room as their summer residence.
In the squash court, as in the pool room, the simplicity of the scenographic principles invite visitors to observe equally that which is on exhibit along with the architecture, which was designed ninety years ago by Robert Mallet-Stevens.

Finally, arranged on the terrace — an open-air connecting space between the pool room and the squash court — are four abstract concrete shapes painted in black, provided for visitors as potential seats. Like readymades, they are in fact issued from a banal catalogue of anti-parking bollards. Their presence here introduces a certain irony in relationship to my own work, to such an extent the formal analogy of these shapes with my own vocabulary appears obvious. The simple change of context and colour render these objects pleasant and welcoming and reveals their hitherto barely considered beauty.


Pierre Charpin