• Villa Noailles
    Vue d'ensemble, 1929
    Photographe inconnu, carte postale
    Collection villa Noailles
  • Villa Noailles
    Vue du jardin moderne de Gabriel Guévrékian, 1928
    Planche du portfolio "Terrasses et Jardins", L'Art International d'Aujourd'hui N°4
    Photographe : Thérèse Bonney
    Collection villa Noailles
  • Villa Noailles
    Vue du parvis, 1928
    Photographe : Thérèse Bonney
    Collection privée
  • Villa Noailles
    Vue de la piscine, 1928
    Planche du portfolio "Terrasses et Jardins", L'Art International d'Aujourd'hui N°4
    Photographe : Thérèse Bonney
    Collection villa Noailles
  • Villa Noailles
    Vue des salles à manger, 1928
    Photographe : Thérèse Bonney
    Collection privée
  • Villa Noailles
    Vue du salon rose, 1928
    Photographe : Thérèse Bonney
    Collection privée
  • Villa Noailles
    Vue d'une des chambres d'ami aménagé par Djo-Bourgeois, 1928
    Photographe : Thérèse Bonney
    Collection privée
  • Charles et Marie-Laure de Noailles, Hyères, 1928
    Extrait du film de Jacques Manuel, Biceps et Bijoux
    CNC, archives du film
  • Charles et Marie-Laure de Noailles, Barcelone, 1929
    Photomaton
    Collection privée
  • De g. à d. : Henri Sauguet, Jean Desbordes, Luis Buñuel, Francis Poulenc, Christian Bérard et Alberto Giacometti durant le festival musical à Hyères, avril 1932
    Photographe inconnu
    Collection villa Noailles (ancienne collection I. Markevitch)
hyères 27
Charles et Marie-Laure de Noailles, une vie de mécènes horaires
Through this new display, the permanent exhibition “Charles and Marie-Laure de Noailles, a life as patrons” continues to examine its role at the heart of the villa, as an anti-museographic process which aims to place the past within a contemporary perspective. Inaugurated four years ago, the exhibition consists of more or less two hundred documents, plans, works, furnishings, objects, films and soundtracks, and occupy the entirety of the initial building – designed in 1924 by Robert Mallet-Stevens – along with the Salon Rose (1927), approximately 200m2 in total.
This exhibition answers a need to retrace the villa’s history, as well as positioning it within the incredible trajectory of two amazing individuals: Charles and Marie- Laure de Noailles, rich aristocrats who devoted a large part of their lives to supporting artistic reflection and creation by any means necessary. This, admittedly modest, collection is gradually expanding and constitutes the heart of the exhibition. It is supported by numerous exceptional loans and deposits, as much from public institutions as from private collectors.

It is organised freely by association, across different fields: disciplines (arts, literature, ethnography), descriptions of the villa’s rooms and highlighted artists, thus perpetuating a fertile dialogue between history and fiction, constraints and freedom, between this century and the last.

In addition to a certain number of new pieces belonging to the collection, a range of furnishings will be revealed, such as a bench and lamps that the scenographer and designer David des Moutis has added, thus continuing to populate the space.

The Fonds National d’Art Contemporain, introducing a new mode of collaboration with the villa Noailles, will exhibit tableware in the dining room designed by the American artist Sol Lewitt. If these works evoke the different ceramics that have decorated this room at various times, the artist’s features are also summoned in more ways than one throughout the villa, whose precise proportions are not without recalling Theo van Doesbourg’s flower room.