SHORTLISTED DESIGNERS

Olivier Borde, France, Men's collection
Titipon Chitsantisook, Thailand, Women's collection
Matthew Cunnington, United Kingdom, Women's collection
Titi Kwan, France, Women's collection
Miriam Lehle, Germany, Women's collection
Jean-Paul Lespagnard, Belgium, Women's collection
Lucia Sanchez, Argentina, Women's collection
Isabelle Steger, Austria, Mixed collection
Graham Tabor, USA, Men's collection
Stella Valentic & Julie Kéchichian, France, Women's collection

The outfits of the 2008 shortlisted fashion designers have been shot by Jessica Roberts, awarded of the Photography Grand Prix at the 2007 Hyères Festival.

 
FASHION JURY

Riccardo Tisci, Givenchy, Paris (President of the jury)
Haider Ackermann, designer, Paris
Loïc Prigent, filmmaker, journalist, Paris
Maria Luisa, Maria Luisa, Paris
Stéphanie Moisdon, curator, Paris
Floriane de Saint-Pierre, CEO of Floriane de Saint-Pierre & ass., Paris / Milan
Sonja Noël, Stijl, Brussels
Carla Sozzani, Corso Como, Milan
Caroline Fabre, Studio Azzedine Alaïa, Paris
Patti Wilson, stylist, New York
Sarah Rutson, Lane Crawford, Hong Kong


 
Olivier Borde
France

Men's Collection: "Garde-robe 1"

Olivier Borde studied at the ESMA, Montpellier. He lives and works in Paris, where he improved his craft with Charles Anastase, amongst others. For the Hyères Festival, he is offering his vision of what is a precarious exercise: reinventing the great classics of male fashion. He readjusts volumes and lengths, opposes supple and rigid fabrics, long and short, narrow and wide. These disproportions of silhouette create an anamorphic effect. He fuses vintage fabrics, hand finishing, and outmoded details, in an artisan and poetic tradition of fashion. If he feminises even a touch the design, notably in his use of precious accessories, he refuses to go as far as travesty. Borde imagines his collection to be worn by a man who has remained a rebellious adolescent, drawing his sombre and melancholic side from the paintings of Francisco Goya and borrowing his romantic and rebellious features from Tadzio in Death in Venice.
 
oborde@gmail.com




Sketch by Olivier Borde
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outfit by Olivier Borde
photographed by © Jessica Roberts, 2008
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Titipon Chitsantisook
Thailand

Women's Collection : "Never Ending Story"

Titipon Chitsantisook was born in Thailand, but has spent the past two years living in Paris, whilst undertaking a course at the Institute Marangoni. His work is based upon an observation: the manner in which we dress no longer necessarily reflects our belonging to a social rank, an ethnic group, a profession or sexual identity. This blurring of paradigms implies that we can create our own style, separate from any archetype, personal experience, expression of cultural interest, or personal desires. This state of ‘liberating confusion’ is an important source of inspiration for Chitsantisook, within which he sees the possibility for creating stylistic and poetic configurations. These uniformly black silhouettes borrow certain elements of urban fashion, as if to pass unseen or to shield themselves. Under this modest appearance, each movement reveals a sophisticated use of pleats, cuts or trims which give measure to the material. Each outfit seems living, threaded with flux and energy, ready to accompany us in future transformations.

boundforbangkok@hotmail.com



Sketch by Titipon Chitsantisook
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outfit by Titipon Chitsantisook
photographed by © Jessica Roberts, 2008
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Matthew Cunnington
United Kingdom

Women's Collection : "Hail Mary"

Matthew Cunnington is a graduate of the University of Westminster. He takes his inspiration from the life of his own mother who in 1969, due to social pressure, was forced to abandon her illegitimate daughter, meeting again only thirty years later. This collection, defined by the memory of this reconciliation, can be understood in a more symbolic than narrative fashion. A tightly worn draped dress ‘contains the emotion on the inside’. A cloth burnt with acid evokes the ‘fragility of this poignant story’. An exposed pocket on a coat signifies that ‘there is nothing left to hide’. The shoulders are accentuated in order to depict the anxiety and guilt carried for so long. Insignificant details suddenly gain a disproportionate importance, such as the large buttons sewn on the front of the dress. Delicate and intimate, this collection invites us to delve into the recollections and emotions of a woman.

matthewcunnington@fsmail.net






Sketch by Matthew Cunnington
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Sketch by Matthew Cunnington
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outfit by Matthew Cunnington
photographed by © Jessica Roberts, 2008
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Titi Kwan
France

Women's Collection

Titi Kwan, originally from Hong Kong, has lived for the past twenty-five years in Paris, where he studied at Studio Berçot. He took three years to develop this collection, striving to invent his own codes and refusing any obvious influences. Except for one: Madeleine Vionnet, an irreplaceable tutelary figure in the matters of precision and finish. Work is carried out directly on the dressmaker's dummy, without undertaking a sketch phase (the pattern being constructed afterwards). In addition to the sober treatment of lines sewed with and against the bias, Titi Kwan has added the flamboyance of a childhood passion: the art of folding. In fact, architecture, geometry, physics or anatomy are all a source of inspiration for a collection devised for movement. Physical comfort is therefore just as important as the flow of the design. The designer never tires of imagining new surprising details, transforming proportions, re-associating colours and fabrics… Titi Kwan whirls, ruffles and charms.

titikwan@hotmail.com



Sketch by Titi Kwan
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outfit by Titi Kwan
photographed by © Jessica Roberts, 2008
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Miriam Lehle
Germany

Women's Collection : "Golden Decay"

Miriam Lehle graduated from the university of Pforzheim in 2007. Her collection is based upon a rather peculiar experimentation with textiles: she delicately burns fabrics containing synthetic fibres. Crinkled and flocked, the fabric takes on strangely fashioned surfaces. The inspiration for this research comes from images of a long burnt and ruined château somewhere in Belgium: lichen and mushrooms invade sections of the furrowed walls, but the refined atmosphere of the past remains discernible. Miriam Lehle has envisaged these outfits as striking a balance between beauty and disaster. If they seem to deconstruct, it is in a delicate, decorative manner, with even a ‘glamorous’ touch. The shape of each item is always formed as a result of the material obtained from the fire, whilst conserving fit and comfort. Uniting both a sense of poetry and efficiency, this designer has developed an unique aesthetic, which is at the same time precious and violent.

miriamlehle@web.de



Sketch by Miriam Lehle
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outfit by Miriam Lehle
photographed by © Jessica Roberts, 2008
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Jean-Paul Lespagnard
Belgium

Women's Collection : “Ich will’nen cowboys als mann”

Jean-Paul Lespagnard loves his country, Belgium, the kingdom of the ‘pomme frite’. He insists that it be noted that he works not just in Brussels but also Antwerp, or Liège where he studied at the IFPME. For this collection, he has imagined a colourful character, called Jacqueline, who runs a well known ‘fritkot’, where admirers come from afar to sample her crisp little fries. Jacqueline has two passions in life: the kitsch Danish singer Gitte and a deep fondness for Texas; in particular its rodeo clowns – the men relied upon to distract the bull when the cowboy hits the dust. Her wardrobe is the epitome of her passions: Jean-Paul Lespagnard combines the clown's stripes, the cowboy's trousers, and Texan shirts with a large serving of 100% Belgian fancy. The ‘teepee’ print material is cut from children's tents, the volumes are purposefully extravagant, the bracelets in the shape of chips. Behind her counter, Jacqueline is always ready for the day a man in cowboy boots will carry her away from this place.

ilovejp1@mac.com



Sketch by Jean-Paul Lespagnard
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outfit by Jean-Paul Lespagnard
photographed by © Jessica Roberts, 2008
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Lucia Sanchez
Argentina

Women's Collection : "Tradiciones recicladas"

Lucía Sanchez, a graduate of St Martins College of Art and Design, has lived for the past five years in Europe, where she has worked for Marni and Gucci. Her inspiration arises from the contrasts in the cultural codes which form her identity. In this collection she has attempted to sew links between Argentina traditions and Western modernity. Spending much of her time on planes, she is required, due to recent security regulations, to keep her belongings in plastic bags. Consequently, she attributes this material with a certain emotional value, leading to its re-utilisation as a source of new textures. She takes pleasure in recreating traditional lacework out of silver plastic. With the aim of ‘recycling traditions’, in both materials and craftsmanship, she operates surprising semantic changes, such as these high-heeled shoes where the heel has been replaced by a bull's horn. There is a strong sense of personality, generosity, of rhythm and tenderness in this fashion which is both folk and modern, proud and amusing, all at the same time.

lucia@luciasanchez.com



Sketch by Lucia Sanchez
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outfit by Lucia Sanchez
photgraphed by © Jessica Roberts, 2008
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Isabelle Steger
Austria

Mixed Collection : "iTrue"

Isabelle Steger was born in 1984, making her almost predestined to quote George Orwell. Graduate of the Applied Arts School of Vienna, where she studied under Raf Simons and Veronique Branquinho, her collection could easily befit the characters of this English novelist. In effect, this designer wants to question and disturb by introducing social problems into fashion. She creates, starting with ordinary elements from the wardrobe of an office employee (suit, overcoat), strange uniforms which reveal the consequences of our post-industrial society: precariousness and alienation, market dictatorship, dematerialisation, monochromatic appearance. She modifies the proportions of her designs, which become larger and more geometrical, as if alive in their own right. Their over-dimensioned size corresponds with a desire for comfort, but also procures a powerful and imposing stature for the person that wears them. Whilst symbolising a possible revolt, Isabelle Steger questions, but does not provide answers, nor does she want to offer any.

isabellesteger@gmx.at


Sketch by Isabelle Steger
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Sketch by Isabelle Steger
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outfit by Isabelle Steger
photographed by © Jessica Roberts, 2008
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Graham Tabor
USA

Men's Collection

Graham Tabor lives and works in New York, but it is in Paris under the influence of Sébastien Meunier, that he learnt his art. He voluntarily compares his collection to that of an archaeological dig: each fragment separate from the rest, almost veiling its origin. Translucent like tracing paper, constructed of torn stitches, openwork and punctuations, the clothes form a complex game of superimpositions. Comparable to the interventions of the American artist Gordon Matta-Clark, to whom Graham Tabor makes reference, these slits do not reveal the body which is underneath, but on the contrary, alter its perception, deform it and unveil unexpected segments. Organic and sensual hairstyles, intertwinings of hair and textiles, extend each silhouette. These features grant the tribe which wears them the allure of strange warriors. Tabor's man seems dressed for the sacred ritual which would mark a return to life after a long silence.

graham@egamidesign.com




Sketch by Graham Tabor
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Sketch by Graham Tabor
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outfit by Graham Tabor
photographed by © Jessica Roberts, 2008
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Stella Valentic & Julie Kéchichian
France

Women's Collection

Stella Valentic and Julie Kéchichian met in Paris behind the workbenches of Studio Berçot, thanks to their shared passion for hip-hop. For their first collection, they have decided to translate the ease and casualness which is distinct to this musical movement, but without using its iconography. Instead, they have taken their inspiration from the visual universe of the Ndebele people, who live between South Africa and Zimbabwe, and are renowned for their painted houses and long-necked women. It is not uncommon to see these women re-adapt brand t-shirts to fit with their own traditional costumes, or to wear garish trainers which they redecorate themselves. Starting with basic outfits, voluntarily ‘prêt-à-porter’, Stella and Julie wander, with humour and tenderness, through a world of sophisticated cross-culturality. African imagery insinuates itself through artful and funny accessories, largely borrowed from an essentially European repertoire. Let the safari begin.

stella.valentic@gmail.com
kokosch@hotmail.fr


Sketch by Stella Valentic & Julie Kéchichian
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outfit by Stella Valentic & Julie Kéchichian
photographed by © Jessica Roberts, 2008
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Olivier Borde

Titipon Chitsantisook

Matthew Cunnington

Titi Kwan

Miriam Lehle

Jean-Paul Lespagnard

Lucia Sanchez

Isabelle Steger

Graham Tabor

Stella Valentic & Julie Kéchichian