SHORTLISTED PHOTOGRAPHERS

Amy Adams, USA
Linus Bill, Switzerland
Melanie Bonajo & Emmeline de Mooij, Netherlands
Anita Cruz-Eberhard, USA
Chris Engman, USA
Alejandra Laviada, Mexico
Ovidiu Pavel, Romania
Ahndraya Parlato, USA
Louise Te Poele, Netherlands
Daniel Traub, USA

 
PHOTOGRAPHY JURY

Tim Walker, Photographer, London
Janet Froelich, Creative Director, The New York Times, New York
Clément Chéroux, Curator, Photography Department, Centre Pompidou, Paris
Jen Bekman, Gallerist, Jen Bekman Gallery, New York
Peter Knapp, Art Director, Photographer, Paris
Mae Delaney, Photographic Editor, AnOther Magazine, AnOther Man, London
Jean-Luc Chirio, Global Print Manager, Publicis Conseil, Paris
Stefanie Braun, Curator, The Photographers' Gallery, London
Erik Kessels, Founder & Creative Director, KesselsKramer, Amsterdam
William Ewing, Director, Musée de L'Elysée,  Lausanne

 
Amy Adams
USA

Amy Adams (1986) is American who lives in New York. She studied at the School of Visual Arts in New York. From her bedroom window, she films an elevated subway station on 125th street in New York. The station platform becomes a stage where thousands of people of all ages and backgrounds appear day after day, oblivious to the presence of a distant camera. Waiting, night and eventually tiredness isolate them in a mental space that excludes their immediate environment. Amy Adams captures these wandering individuals, who are shrouded in a dark mist, from which the structure and outlines of their faces emerge. The poor quality of the image source (video), with its blurring, generates great pictorial richness in Amy Adams’s work. She blows up the image, zooming in on the face, which becomes distanced, hidden in misty, white, black, or grey expanses.
Her work recently appeared in the magazine Dear Dave, New York.


Amy Adams, Untitled, 2008
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Amy Adams, Untitled, 2008
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Amy Adams, Untitled, 2008
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Linus Bill
Switzerland

Linus Bill’s work is compulsive. He photographs everything, all the time: people he knows, people he doesn’t know, interiors, exteriors, living things, objects, snapshots, posed scenes. No predetermined theme or criteria dictates the shot. Bill doesn’t adopt a serial approach. He photographs whatever he likes. Recent photos join the old ones in his archives, which he draws on to put together a set for an exhibition or a publication. These displays of groups of images offer a personal vision that is endlessly renewed – in keeping with the space and the mood of the moment – made up of moments that pleased him, which are presented unencumbered by theoretical discourses long or short. Each image is reproduced on a large scale using serigraphy, a process that endows these shots with a new pictorial character that is unique to each one. Reality as constituted by Linus Bill is a weird, comical and tender puzzle, totally new.

Linus Bill (1982) studied at the University of Arts in Zurich. He lives in Bienne (Switzerland) and since 2006 has exhibited in Hamburg, Zurich and New York.
www.linusbill.com


Linus Bill, Untitled, 2008
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Linus Bill, Untitled, 2008
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Linus Bill, Untitled, 2008
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Melanie Bonajo & Emmeline de Mooij
The Netherlands

Melanie Bonajo and Emmeline de Mooij (1978), who are based in Amsterdam, graduated from the Gerrit Rietveld Academy with diplomas in 2002. Emmeline started creating installations, while Melanie began experimenting with photography. However, both share an approach that is close to performance, often using their bodies in their mises en scène. It would thus be inappropriate to try to associate their work with a particular medium. Accustomed to artistic collaboration, they have joined forces for the project ‘Bush Compulsion: A Primitive Breakthrough in the Modern Mind’, which is being presented at the festival. The artists ask whether the comforts of modern life have caused us to lose our links with nature and its manifestations, disease and death. Has this interconnection been lost for good? Melanie Bonajo and Emmeline de Mooij shed their clothes and every other artefact of daily life, and, naked, they spend their days in the wood. Masks, fetish objects and adornments recall the society that they left behind at the edge of the forest: these new savages are adorned with bubble wrap and motorcycle helmets. The artists experiment; their sincere approach combines artistic genres seamlessly, as they decorously tread the fresh earth.

Melanie Bonajo and Emmeline de Mooij have published respectively in Capricious, Kilimanjaro and Livraison, Famous, and exhibited mainly in Holland.
www.melaniebonajo.com / www.emmelinedemooij.com


Melanie Bonajo & Emmeline de Mooij, "Bush Compulsion A Primitive Breakthrough in the Modern Mind", 2008-2009
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Melanie Bonajo & Emmeline de Mooij, "Bush Compulsion A Primitive Breakthrough in the Modern Mind", 2008-2009
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Melanie Bonajo & Emmeline de Mooij, "Bush Compulsion A Primitive Breakthrough in the Modern Mind", 2008-2009
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Anita Cruz-Eberhard
USA

Anita Cruz-Eberhard (1974), who was born in Switzerland, is based in New York. During the festival she will be presenting her ‘digital ikebanas’, a series of slender bouquets inspired by Japanese flower arrangements, which explore the ambiguous relationship between nature and artifice. The compositions are made up of a wide variety of species, from rare flowers to weeds, and from common, sometimes invasive specimens to plants that are becoming extinct or have disappeared. The artist picks them on the Internet, exploring the databases of university biology departments. She chooses, composes, arranges and appropriates this borrowed material until she has obtained a structure that is linear and harmonious, thereby transposing the discipline of ikebana, with its meticulous work of arranging and assembling, to a computer.

Anita Cruz-Eberhard studied at the International Center of Photography (New York), then at the School of Visual Arts, New York, receiving her diploma in 2007. She exhibited her work at the Pingyao International Photography Festival in 2006, as well as at the Sony World Photography Awards in 2008.


Anita Cruz-Eberhard, "Digital Ikebana", 2008- in progress
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Anita Cruz-Eberhard, "Digital Ikebana", 2008- in progress
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Anita Cruz-Eberhard, "Digital Ikebana", 2008- in progress
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Chris Engman
USA

Chris Engman (1978) is based in Seattle. The artist has chosen to explore the vast landscapes of the state of Washington, which provide fertile terrain for his experiments. He inserts strange, complex artefacts and erects frames in the desert, as if attempting to circumscribe these endless, wild spaces. The structures he erects are demanding and involve several days of reconnaissance and construction for the artist in order to wed them to their natural environment. The sun’s trajectory and its effect on the sculptural forms of these structures are carefully studied. The structures shun ostentation and even succeed in making us forget how expertly they were made. All that remains is the image, whose obviousness conveys a feeling of lightness. According to the artist, this determined, often solitary work is a form of meditation.

Chris Engman studied at the University of Washington. A member of the SOIL artistic cooperative, he is represented by the Greg Kucera Gallery (Seattle).

www.chrisengman.com


Chris Engman, "The Consummation", 2005
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Chris Engman, "Three Squares", 2006
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Chris Engman, "The Haul", 2006
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Alejandra Laviada
Mexico

Alejandra Laviada steps inside the many abandoned buildings in Mexico City and looks around. Sometimes she decides to take possession of them. Entering a deserted hotel, she recorded the traces left by the former occupants of the place – both clients and furniture. She began to move things around and to cut things up, assembling the materials that she found there, thereby going beyond the photographic record to adopt an approach that combined performance and sculpture. The works presented here – ‘photo sculptures’ – are a continuation of the artist’s work of appropriation, which began with Hotel Bamer. Laviada explored the floors of another building, collecting isolated objects of a similar kind that had been scattered about the place and grouping them together. Here letters that came from signs have been assembled together, rolls of paint form a rainbow and chairs attempt to execute an acrobatic figure. The brooms join other brooms, and cans and paint pots are clustered together. The artist does not restrict herself to reconstituting typologies by appropriating these objects. They become material for ephemeral installations, which are preserved in the photographs. These sculptures of worn out, forgotten objects are sensitive evocations of the building’s past and, in a wider sense, that of Mexico City, a place of endless change.

Alejandra Laviada (1980) lives and works in Mexico. She studied at the School of Visual Arts in New York, and recently exhibited at the New York Photo Festival and at the Danziger Projects gallery in New York. She has also contributed to The New York Times Magazine and Wallpaper*.
www.alejandralaviada.com


Alejandra Laviada, "Photo Sculptures", 2007
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Alejandra Laviada, "Photo Sculptures", 2007
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Alejandra Laviada, "Photo Sculptures", 2007
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Ovidiu Pavel
Romania

Ovidiu Pavel comes full circle, creating here in his series of four images a mise en abyme of representation. The artist constructs graphic two-dimensional structures, which are conceived to be viewed from a single viewpoint. This work can be seen as a continuation of the conceptual exploration of the medium of photography that began in earnest in the 1970s. Ovidiu Pavel studies the relationship of this monocular medium, essentially characterised by its two-dimensionality, to space. A giant hammer placed on the immaculate expanse of snow, a black table whose feet stand in a paper beehive, a parallelepiped with a framework made out of adhesive tape – the artist draws and paints on real things. Sometimes, as in the case of this floating structure made out of adhesive tape, he attempts to create the illusion of the plane, pinned against three-dimensional space, fusing the two dimensions produced by the image. There are no anamorphic areas of colour in vast spaces – in Pavel’s work the constructed object is never far away, allowing us to appreciate its strategies. The unstable image wavers between illusion and the analysis of illusion, thereby revealing its optical tricks.

After studying economics at the Academy of Bucarest, Romanian artist Ovidiu Pavel (1979) joined the Royal Academy in The Hague, where he graduated in 2008. He currently lives in the Netherlands, where he works with photography and video.
www.ovidiupavel.com


Ovidiu Pavel, Untitled, 2008
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Ovidiu Pavel, Untitled, 2008
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Ovidiu Pavel, Untitled, 2008
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Ahndraya Parlato
USA

Blond hair caught in a door, a bluish forefinger, a glass that has been knocked over spilling milk on the table, a one-eyed white sheet – Ahndraya Parlato slides under the verneer of reality and reveals through her photographic mises en scène a world divorced from any order or logic. Her images do not yield straight away. Their ambiguity impedes hasty interpretation. But then, little by little, these isolated fragments communicate with each other; lines between them form, eventually creating the Parlato constellation. These images, grouped together under the title Inscapes, upset the established order and remind us of the inherent strangeness, latent everywhere, of this world, which resists our efforts at regulation and organisation. Going against the grain, the artist attempts to scratch the film of normality to restore a wild reality, unpoliced and irrational.

Ahndraya Parlato studied at Wells College in Paris, then Bard College (NY). She has exhibited in the US and more recently at the Helsinki Biennale. She currently lives in Ithaca (NY).
www.ahndrayaparlato.com


Ahndraya Parlato, "Inscape", 2003 - in progress
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Ahndraya Parlato, "Inscape", 2003 - in progress
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Ahndraya Parlato, "Inscape", 2003 - in progress
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Louise Te Poele
The Netherlands

Louise Te Poele talks of Egon Schiele, but Lucian Freud comes to mind as well. Louise draws tortured faces, whose bony structures are reinforced by strong contrasts of light and dark. One day, when she was visiting her parents, who lived in a village of farmers in Holland, at their request she went to a village fête, where she saw, there in front of her, her drawings: faces with pronounced features, marked with broad purple-red patches. Her father had told her what his grandfather had told him, that the village, a Catholic enclave in a Protestant region, was at the time encouraged by the priest to indulge in intermarriage in order to ensure the survival of the community. Louise observed the traces left by these past practices on current generations. She took photographs, isolating the faces from the noisy context of the fête. They frown, mouths open in laughter or hurling invective, sometimes wearing an absent look, making irate gestures. Using her palette, she exaggerates the reds, and pushes her exploration of the complex geography of these faces to uncomfortable extremes, creating a gallery of masks redolent of the tragicomedy of antiquity.

Louise Te Poele (1984) graduated from the ArtEZ school (fine arts and fashion department) in Arnhem in 2008 in the Netherlands. Her work was recently exhibited at the Arte Laguna art festival in Venice.
www.louisetepoele.nl



Louise Te Poele, "Farmers", 2008
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Louise Te Poele, "Farmers", 2008
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Louise Te Poele, "Farmers", 2008
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Daniel Traub
USA

Daniel Traub (1971) is American. He studied at the School of Visual Arts, New York, and lives in Philadelphia. A photographer, Straub is interested in cities, in its gaps and borderline spaces and the people that occupy them. He recently settled in Shanghai, portraying its inhabitants and the urban spaces they pass through. His approach involves a subtle combination of documentary distance and empathy for the subject. He does not seek spectacular effects, always maintaining a human scale. Returning to the United States, he tackled another city in mutation: Philadelphia. The series presented here, called Inner City, depicts deserted intersections, walled up facades and closed faces, conveying a slow, silent, urban and human drift.

Daniel Traub has recently exhibited in Belfast, Houston, and Chicago and has contributed to The New York Times Magazine, The Telegraph Magazine and Wallpaper.
www.danieltraub.net


Daniel Traub, "Inner City", USA, 2008 - in progress
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Daniel Traub, "Inner City", USA, 2008 - in progress
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Daniel Traub, "Inner City", USA, 2008 - in progress
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Amy Adams

Linus Bill

Melanie Bonajo & Emmeline de Mooij

Anita Cruz-Eberhard

Chris Engman

Alejandra Laviada

Ovidiu Pavel

Ahndraya Parlato

Louise Te Poele

Daniel Traub