Steven Meisel

Squash, villa Noailles

THREE HUNDRED AND SEVENTEEN & COUNTING

Steven Meisel is fashion's pre-eminent image-maker — prolific and innovative — visualizing the trends of every fashion season since the 1980s. Along with his ability to cast the faces and characters that come to represent the look of fashion, Meisel has a prodigious talent for scripting story lines that reference and reflect culture.
For well over two decades, he has created every cover and lead editorial story for each issue of Italian Vogue.  There may be no other photographer-magazine relationship in any other field of such long-lasting commitment and innovation.

Meisel not only depicts fashion, he defines it, and gives it cultural resonance. His influences and inspirations are varied, culled from design, architecture, art, cinema, and literature. Meisel has also portrayed our leading actresses and entertainers, defining the relationships between celebrity and fashion in the process. Most notably, Meisel collaborated with Madonna to create their notorious book Sex (1992).

As the primary photographer for American and Italian Vogue, Steven Meisel's continued interpretations lead and influence our understanding of contemporary fashion. Each season, he has also created some of fashion's most memorable campaigns for Prada, Dolce & Gabbana, Valentino, Mulberry, Lanvin, and Versace.



Steven Meisel, Vogue Italia, December 2008
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Steven Meisel, Vogue Italia, January 2009
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Steven Meisel, Vogue Italia, February 2009
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Kris Van Assche

Piscine, villa Noailles


David Casini

Gymnase, villa Noailles


Stylist meets artist - Artist meets stylist
Or, flowers and time

Where does Kris Van Assche find his sustenance?

In art and freedom, in music and images, in scents and flowers.

This exhibition at the Villa Noailles speaks of all of these forms of sustenance. Of flowers firstly. At the Villa Noailles, there is a room dedicated to flowers, the room where  bouquets are prepared. Mirrors on the outside of the windows reflect the daylight, in order to make it brighter inside: the flowers love this light. Van Assche has a hummingbird tattooed on his left arm. This bird symbolises freedom, and finds its sustenance in flowers.

In the villa “pool room”, bathed in light, where the bay windows open out onto the garden, Van Assche has installed fifteen or so flowers, mounted upon stems like music stands, cubist flowers, geometrical, strong like warriors, robot flowers, made of mirrors  which reflect the trees in the garden. At the heart of the corollae of these mysterious flowers, is all that sustains Kris: images and music, South America and its scent… But beauty, in order to be attained, requires effort, attention, humility: to reach some, one must climb up onto a chair, for others, on the contrary, one must crouch down in order to allow one's face to slip amongst the petals, like a hummingbird, because being free, cannot be easy. One must dare first.

Kris Van Assche does not exhibit his clothes. Clothes, according to Van Assche, are to be worn, not to be exhibited. Clothes are meant to make men more handsome… He therefore asks that other artists play with his style: Andrea Mastrovito in Paris and David Casini in Hyères.

This joint exhibition of Kris Van Assche and David Casini is the result of an encounter and a deep personal resemblance. Both come from historic and aesthetic towns, Antwerp and Florence, North and South, art and craftsmanship, combining an ambition for perfection with the modesty of work, dream with reality, in Antwerp, diamonds and fashion, in Florence, marble and leather. David Casini, conceptually speaking, works on the relationship between space and time. He creates spaces covered in (imitation) marble, or entirely obscured, he plays with perfect perspectives which freeze time, mixes temporal references until the spectator loses themselves in a suggested space, a non-existent time, a worrying obscurity which increases sensations tenfold. In a lost time-space, a man, perhaps himself, clothed by Van Assche, speaks.

Van Assche and Casini, a poetics of contemporary times, of a time to be recreated, in an imaginary space, a nowhere of freedom.

Barbara Polla



Coproduced by La Galerie des Galeries, Galeries Lafayette Haussmann. 


Kris Van Assche, © KVA Studio, 2009
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© David Casini, 2009
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Peter Knapp

Tour des Templiers, Centre historique, Hyères

Peter Knapp readily admits that he likes to break rules and mix genres. Born in 1931, he took up photography in 1945. Two years later he began studying graphic design at the Zurich school of art. Keen to paint and continue his studies in Paris, he left Switzerland in 1952 and entered the École des Beaux-Arts. He continued with his work in graphic design and his research into typography, quickly attracting attention. He was hired by the Galeries Lafayette to create their window displays and advertising campaigns. He was only 24 at the time. He then met Hélène Lazareff, who appointed him art director of the publication she managed, Le Nouveau Femina. Their collaboration then continued with the magazine Elle, between 1959 and 1966. Drawing on ‘primitive’ art and the decorative arts, Peter Knapp was passionate about creating images. Influenced by the creations of Alexey Brodovitch on the other side of the Atlantic, he sought to inject artistic creativity into this mainstream magazine. The art director commissioned fashion series from Sarah Moon, Toscani, and Sieff, and naturally also took photographs himself.
In his layouts, text and image are telescoped together to form large visual compositions. The title runs right across the double page, while the model appears to break out of the picture frame. Peter Knapp explored the medium of photography, using colour at a time when black and white was widely favoured. He experimented with new processes, like that of filming in 16 mm to extract photogrammes, which he then published in the magazine. He also loved the medium of film, and in 1966 he embarked on a series of short films devoted to fashion for television, the famous Dim Dam Dom.
After Elle came Stern, Vogue and The Sunday Times. He returned to Elle between 1974 and 1978, but eventually grew weary of the overriding need for beautiful images in the fashion press, preferring to concentrate on his own work.
Peter Knapp is based in Paris, where he continues his artistic work.


Peter Knapp, Stern, 1967
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© Peter Knapp
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Peter Knapp, The Sunday Times Magazine, 1967
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Peter Knapp, Vogue, 1967
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Swash

Salon de lecture, salle à manger, chambres du rez-de-chaussée, villa Noailles

After winning the Festival Hyeres in 2004, Sarah Swash & Toshio Yamanaka have gone on to successfully pursue a line of their own ready-to-wear garments, as well as a seasonal collection of illustrated silk scarves. These scarves are an idiosyncratic vision of earthly delight, inspired by the fanciful subjectivity of early natural history. Depictions of rare flora and fauna are immortalized as moments and memories that now seem ephemeral and naïve. Objects are removed from their natural environments and rearranged in an imagined space, which is delightful in its overabundance and impossibility. The scarves represent exactly this sort of imagined space, where a rich botanical world interacts with insects, jewels, Faberge eggs, lengths of chain, and a whippet named Candy. The illustrations are first drawn by hand with ink, then painted in watercolour and transferred to silk. The result is at once technically precise and logically absurd.

Swash returns to villa Noailles this spring to take us on an illustrative journey of their creative mind. This journey begins with a retrospective of scarves, which are then displayed in their composite forms, as a series of illustrations at various stages of production. These illustrations are complete works in their own right and act as windows into the world that Swash imagines. The design duo then attempt to reconstruct their world in three-dimensional form, building from the proportions and themes of their drawings. It is a sweet parody of the natural world, which is both distinct and complicit with the beautiful garden setting surrounding the Villa.

www.swash.co.uk


Swash, "scarf", 2008/2009
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Swash, "Drawing", 2008
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Audrey Corregan
Photographic assignment, installation

Salon rose, villa Noailles

OLD MASTER MUSLIN


Audrey Corregan won the Grand Prix du Jury Photographie du Festival 2008. She presented hieratic portraits of urban birds, seen from behind.
Motorised machines enclosed in covers, bodies squeezed into clothing, family photos that have been turned over – the artist’s work, made up of photographic projects and artist’s books, is a meditation on the concepts of concealment, opacity and memory.
Audrey Corregan returns to Hyères to exhibit her unusual personal venture.
The artist graduated from the Gerrit Rietveld Academy in Amsterdam in 2007, and is currently based in New York, where she is doing a post-grad course at the School of Visual Arts.


Audrey Corregan, "Obviously", 2007
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© Audrey Corregan
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Camille Vivier

Chambre de Monsieur, chambre de Madame, villa Noailles

BOOJIE GIRL

"My photographic approach, and my fashion photography in particular, lead me to regard clothes as photogenic, but detached, objects. Yet, intimately, the cloth, materials, and colours are like second skins, vessels for the soul.
I love the history behind a garment, in the same way that I love the history of an object, of a memory conserved in a silky setting. It is from here that I draw my love of still lifes and mise-en-scène, this need to breath life into what is inanimate, to imagine the mythology of an object and its narrative potential.
In a similar fashion, creating an iconography of clothes, of finery outside of “magazines”, photographing/filming clothes like a panoply, until they become almost personified: a bride's dress, a clown's costume, a matador's “suit of lights”…
The devices and imagery of performance interest me, the scenery, puppets, the popular imagery of the circus and old Paris, are inseparable in my mind. The image of a fantasised town, situated between the 1950s and the 1970s, the Paris of Guy Gilles' films, a blend of harshness and poetry, or that of shops with windows dressed by Janine Janet, exposing a sophistication that is both surrealist and outdated.
There is a desire also, to create characters that are fragile and tender like street urchins, to represent an age which is still close to childhood, faces like portraits, drawing us closer to a certain novelty aesthetic (cf. The Shepherdess and the Chimney Sweep in “The King and the Mockingbird”)

The villa Noailles inspires, because it is a genuine catalyst for arts and modernity, the  proximity of the sea also makes it particularly favourable towards a certain reverie, with an ever present feeling of being both here and elsewhere.
It seems to me to be a perfect location for a dramatisation, where objects would be suspended in time, yet irresistibly attracted towards the light which filters through the glass and under the concrete.
In my photography, it is light too which clothes and shadow which draws outlines.
“Boojie Girl”, the film which I am screening at the villa in the form of a diptych, shows how a moonstruck character – dressed in a white clown's outfit – who, after a long time wandering, dissolves here into a flood of light, or how, blinded by his own radiance, he fuses into the sun and becomes an abstraction of himself, a glimmer, a calm and muted sound, like one might hear by the sea.
My desire is to offer an intimate experience of beauty, that is also like a metaphor of the photographic process in a subliminal state: the subject becomes once again a raw material, grain, light, a revealer of an invisible world, which nonetheless does not alter reality itself.
Echoing the film, are a series of photographs taken over the past two years and which punctuate the scenography “like so many marvellous little photographic dramas”."

Camille Vivier
Paris 7th February 2009

Coproduced by La Galerie des Galeries, Galeries Lafayette Haussmann and with the support of the Art Center Le Moulin, La Valette.


Camille Vivier, "Boojie Girl", 2009
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Amira Fritz
Photographic assignment on the shortlisted fashion designers

Galerie d'actualité, villa Noailles

Winner of the Prix Spécial du Jury Photographie in 2008, Amira Fritz achieved recognition with her silent forest landscapes, bathed in a soft, surreal light and dotted with strange presences: flower arrangements placed in the middle of a clearing or on the edge of the wood.
Following in the footsteps of Jeff Riedel, Vava Ribeiro, Estelle Hanania and more recently Jessica Roberts, Amira Fritz is photographing for the festival the creations of the competing stylists. As well as appearing in the catalogue, these photographs will also be exhibited at the Villa Noailles.
The images from this commission – currently being created – .


Amira Fritz, "Spaziergang im Käferwald" (Promenade in the Beetle Forest), 2007
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Amira Fritz, "Neither dog nor wolf", 2008. ( Outfit: Matthew Cunnington)
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Amira Fritz, "Fuchs und Gans" (Foxes and Geese), 2008
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C'était Hyères

Chambre d'ami, villa Noailles

Where are they now? What have they become?

In 24 years of existence, the Hyères fashion and photography festival has revealed and supported the work of hundreds of designers and photographers. Some, such as Viktor & Rolf or Sølve Sundsbø are now in the foreground of the public eye. Others work under borrowed names, those of the fashion houses they have become an integral part of. Others still have reinvented themselves. All spread the "Hyères spirit" throughout the world.

C’ÉTAIT HYÈRES aims to do a freeze frame on the festival nominees through their films, the shorts which they made or which were made for them. In the era of YouTube, camera-phones and blogs, many are those who have tried the video experience, as an alternative promotional tool to fashion shows and portfolios, or as an artistic domain in dire need of exploration.

C’ÉTAIT HYÈRES is the association of fashion, photography, or completely other-related shorts, linked together by a common souvenir of festival attendance. It's an album of video postcards from previous nominees, with a kind word on the back.

Featuring original contributions by:
Titipon Chitsantisook, Romain Kremer, Popel Coumou, Robi Rodriguez, Cécile Bortoletti, Thomas Mailaender.

And contributions by:
Mareunrol, Anemone Skjoldager, Jean-Paul Lespagnard, Viktor & Rolf, Peter Bertsch / Hornstein, Philippe Jarrigeon, Christian Wijnants, Henrik Vibskov, Sølve Sundsbø, Adi Lavy, Daniel Stier, Shiori Suzuki & Emi Sekiguchi, Esther Teichmann, Luke Stephenson, Ada Bligaard Soby, Joel Tettamanti, Fumiko Imano, Bianca Pilet, Olivier Amsellem, Gaspard Yurkievich, Carolin Lerch / Pelican Avenue, Anke Loh, David Gil, C Neeon, Laitinen, Two Tom and Sebastien Meunier.

"C'était Hyères" by A Shaded View On Fashion Film (ASVOFF)

Scenography by Pierre Vanni and Anna Brun.

With the support of Philips and Smarin.


Yelle in "Ce Jeu", Wanda prod. Direction Yoann Lemoine/ Designer Jean-Paul Lespagnard. Photography: © Antoine Asseraf, 2008
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Yelle in "Ce Jeu", Wanda prod. Direction Yoann Lemoine/ Designer Jean-Paul Lespagnard. Photography: © Antoine Asseraf, 2008
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A Shaded View On Fashion Film

 Couloirs et hall, villa Noailles

« A Shaded View On Fashion Film », or « ASVOFF » if you prefer, is a pioneer because it approaches fashion in a uniquely film-centered way, at a time when the industry is still dominated by the "still" photographic medium.
Because beyond fashion show broadcasts and magazine shoot "behind the scenes" featurettes, there is today such a thing as a fashion film.
Or rather real fashion filmS, whose existence defy labels, which the ASVOFF selection proves:
from Jeremy Scott's snuff movie to the documentary on the elusive Mr. Pearl, from the glamour of Linda Evangelista to the ridicule uncertainty of the first casting of Peter Jensen's models, fashion film shows its true colors.

« A Shaded View On Fashion Film », is a traveling selection of short films, music and art-videos made by fashion, beauty and style-makers: designers, stylists, photographs, artistic directors, etc... Launched in Paris at the Jeu de Paume, then at the Bilbao Guggenheim, Seoul, Mexico City, London, Roma, Tokyo and even Riga, this festival relies on the blog and network of its founder, Diane Pernet, to draw out the mix of new talents and great names essential to sample the "fashion film" palette. Its previous incarnation, You Wear It Well, was shown in the Villa Noailles during the 2007 and 2008 editions.

For its first visit to the festival, ASVOFF grows and multiplies to better evolve with the villa: in addition to the halls, ASVOFF creates in the Chambre d'Ami "C'était Hyères,"  a selection of films entirely dedicated to photographers and designers who went through the festival.
 

The ASVOFF team:

Diane Pernet, founder and curator, is a journalist, blogger, talent scout for the festival, fashion icon for some...
But before all that, she was one of New York's "it" designers, and before that, a film student.
She has been documenting the festival with video for 8 years.

Antoine Asseraf, ASVOFF producer, is graphic designer, ad creative and film director. Since 2006 he directs with Diane the Hyères festival film and produces ASVOFF's various screenings.

David Herman, ASVOFF producer, journalist and head of partnerships for Standard Magazine, is bursting with resources to produce ASVOFF's annual parisian launch.



"Mr. Pearl" by Diane Pernet.
Photography: © Michael James O’Brien
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Linda Evangelista in "Don’t Blink!", by Francesco Carrozzini, 2005
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Ludivine Caillard


DISTORSION PARK

Ludivine Caillard’s exhibition at the Moulin gallery in La Valette-du-Var is entitled “Distorsion Park”. The title refers
to the type of theme park that offers amusement rides which often re-employ a whole world of images, transferred into three dimensions. Each visitor is entertained in a world where reality is transformed: distorted. The “distorted” world which Ludivine Caillard has chosen is that of “patriotic” objects, objects from every day life, in the colours of the American flag. In various different fashions, she transforms these objects into other objects, subjecting them to a distortion which reveals their caricatured nature. Taken as a whole, these distortions thus patiently construct a message of peace and hope.

Luc Sovier


Exhibition from march 3rd to april 27th
Encounter march 17th - 6.30 p.m. with Ludivine Caillard and Alexabdre Mare

Espace d'art Le Moulin
avenue Aristide Briand - 83160 La-Valette-du-Var
T • +33 (0)4 94 23 36 49
lemoulin@lavalette83.fr

Exhibition opened from tuesday to friday from 3.00 pm  to 6.00pm and saturday from 10.00 am to 12.00 am and from 3.00 pm to 6.00 pm
Free entrance

Exhibition: villa de La-Valette-du-Var, with the support of Conseil Général du Var, du Conseil Régional Provence-Alpes-Côte d'Azur et de la Direction Régionale des Affaires Culturelles Provence-Alpes-Côte d'Azur.
In collaboration with the villa Noailles Toulon-Provence-Méditerranée, Festival International de Mode et de Photographie during the annual partnership.


Ludivine Caillard, « Rainbow Tree », 2009. Exhibition « Distorsion Park », Art space Le Moulin, La Valette-du-Var, 2009. Photography : Romain Lopez, 2009
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Steven Meisel

Kris Van Assche

Peter Knapp

Swash

Audrey Corregan

Camille Vivier

Amira Fritz

C'était Hyères

ASVOFF

Ludivine Caillard